“Working in aviation requires a high level of discipline and that can have a positive influence on your whole life.”

Recently, our Facebook page featured some pictures of an Airbus A380 model which was to an amazing 1:13 scale. The post got instantly popular and accomplished an insane reach which we did not expect at all. The love and awe that people gave that model compelled us to reach out to the modeler and maker of the (comparatively) little yet magnificent A380.

Meet Christopher Ferkl, 52, based in Gmünd, Austria. He works as an IT manager for an aviation oriented firm called TEST-FUCHS. After the pictures of his beautiful RC model went explosive, I reached out to him and we had a little chat. For Humans of Aviation, I asked Christopher some questions. A lively and energetic personality, he gave inspiring responses. Let’s have a look at them.

Q. What inspired you to make this A380 model? What was your motivation?

Christopher: I have been flying model airplanes since 30 years. In the recent years, I have been fascinated by multi-engine airplanes especially large airliners. For me, the A380 is one of the most beautiful airplanes ever built and I really wanted to build a model on a larger than usual scale. It was a special challenge for me to build such a large, yet airworthy model airplane. I started working on it in September 2017. The A380 is now ready for take-off and the traffic certification and flight test is planned for March/April 2020. The construction of this aircraft required many skills. Handling carbon, fiberglass, electronics, turning, milling, knowledge of aerodynamics, woodworking, priming, painting, etc

 

Q. What were the difficult times you faced during the planning and designing stage?

Christopher: One of the most difficult and challenging phases was the construction of the wings. This type of aircraft has a curvature that extends over the entire span. This was only possible by building the wings in many small segments. Of course, attention had to be paid to the curve of the wing airfoil. In addition, the calculation of the center of gravity was also a pretty tricky task.

 

Q. What made you join the aviation industry? What is the best part about your job and hobby?

Christopher: Aviation has fascinated me since my childhood. At the age of 25 I was able to get a glider license. With that, model aircraft construction and flying has accompanied me for many years of my life. At a very early age, I started to design and build my own models. Currently, I am the IT manager at a large company that manufactures inspection and test equipment for the aviation industry. For me, the best part is that aviation allows to put many different skills to practice. No matter if it’s a hobby or your profession.

 

Q. What are your words for upcoming aspirants in aviation?

Christopher: To be active in aviation means constant further education, so that one is always in a technical state of mind. Never be afraid to take up this challenge, there are so many different areas of aviation and the opportunities for advancement in the many aviation companies around the world are great. The aviation companies are internationally linked so you come to interact with many different cultures. Overall, working in aviation requires a high level of discipline and that can have a positive influence on your whole life. No matter if its your hobby or your job, aviation will always require high concentration.

There are many people that love airplanes. But very few that prove it in unique ways. Christopher Ferkl is one of them. We at Aviation Geeks wish him all the best for his future endeavors and cannot wait for the beautiful A380 to fly the friendly skies. Christopher Ferkl is an inspiration for us all.

Here is the link to the Facebook post, show your love and support for Christopher in the comments!

Below are some pictures from different phases of the design and making of the A380.

“One of the most difficult and challenging phases was the construction of the wings”

“The A380 is one of the most beautiful aircraft ever built”

“The construction of this aircraft required many skills. Handling carbon, fiberglass, electronics, turning, milling, knowledge of aerodynamics, woodworking, priming, painting, etc”

 

READ MORE: Meet the Mughal Brothers.

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